Dakota Fanning Is Our Hunger 13 Cover Star!

Dakota Fanning is the first of our Hunger 13 cover stars! The iconic young actress stepped into the Hunger Studio for an exclusive shoot with Rankin, inspired by the issue’s ‘Mad World’ theme.

A veteran of the acting game at only 23 years old, Dakota talked to Lily Silverton about her enduring love of film, mental health and the pressures of social media in a wide-ranging new interview.

She shares her excitement about working on the forthcoming Netflix series The Alienist – her very first TV role, shot on location in Budapest – “In TV no one is afraid to be dark or subvert something, or go to a scary place”, and speaks on the importance of using her platform to empower and inspire other young people.

Expect to see Dakota as you never have before, in true Hunger style.

Read the full interview and see the full photoshoot in Hunger Issue 13 #madworld – on sale 5.10.2017

Source: Hunger TV

W Magazine’s Screen Test with Lynn Hirschberg

Actress Dakota Fanning is only 23 years old, but has already been a household name for years thanks to her roles in such varied films as I Am Sam, The Secret Life of Bees, and The Twilight Saga. Most recently, she starred in Brimstone and American Pastoral, a film based on the Philip Roth novel of the same name, as Merry Levov, a teenager who becomes involved in political terrorism; and next, she is collaborating with Kirsten Dunst on an adaptation of Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar. Here, Fanning opens up about these challenging roles, how she handles what people think about her, and more.

Lynn Hirschberg: In 2016 you starred in American Pastoral. How did the project evolve?
Dakota Fanning: So American Pastoral came to me a few years ago, with a different director and with Ewan McGregor and Jennifer Connelly attached as actors to play my parents. So we were all three attached as actors for a while and this director ended up not being able to do it. It was one of those movies that like you kept thinking, “Oh, maybe I’m going to be working on it in the fall,” and then the fall would be there and then you wouldn’t be working on it and, “Oh, maybe it’s going to be in the spring.” It just kept getting pushed and pushed and pushed and then when that director fell out that’s when Ewan asked if he could direct it. And they said yes and he still wanted me to be in it–I definitely had a moment of like, “Oh no, what if he doesn’t want me to do it, like okay, that would be hard,” but he did so that’s that.

In the film, your character is in a cult. Was it difficult for you to go to play such a dark character?
So my character’s name is Merry, in the middle of the film she becomes a Jane. Jane-ism is basically a religion that believes that you do no harm to anything, so that even includes like not bathing because you would be doing harm to the water. They sometimes sweep the ground in front of them so they brush away any living being so they don’t step on them, they wear masks to not harm the air when they breathe, I had a mask that was made out of pantyhose, so it’s super intense. I definitely did have to go to some really dark places but as an actor that is what I look forward to and love doing the most because I like – it makes me feel like I’ve actually done something hard, and pushed myself and – so there’s a sequence in the movie when my character is at her lowest and I couldn’t wait to do those scenes. I was so excited and I could’ve done that the whole time.

Did you stop bathing or did you do anything particular to put yourself in the mood?
I was method by chance simply because I had no energy when I would get back because we were filming all those scenes in the middle of the night so I would kind of get back and not wash my hair and so I was kind of living weirdly as a Jane just by total coincidence, total accident, laziness. Um, but no, most of it is acting.

It’s really a heartbreaking film.
Yeah, Merry goes really dark and I think that Ewan is seeing as her father that pain of sort of losing your child and that there’s nothing you can do. Obviously – I mean, I don’t have kids, but I can imagine that would be the worst thing that could possibly happen to a parent. So those scenes were tough, but they were also kind of inspiring and invigorating. I think Ewan and I felt really connected during those dark scenes as actors and as a director and an actor. My scenes are mostly only with Ewan and he was the director, and that was my first time having the person that you’re opposite direct you. I will really remember the experience of making this film for a lot of reasons but especially that because it was my first time ever having that happen and it couldn’t have been better; it was so wonderful. I loved getting to share that with him too.

How did your family feel watching the film?
Apparently my sister saw the film and had a really horrifying reaction to it like and she got really upset by it. Which I suppose I’m happy about that because that means like it moves somebody and even somebody that knows me as well as my sister that I could still make her feel that way, that was kind of exciting, but then I was like, “But you do the same thing, like what do you mean?” I wasn’t with [my parents] when they watched it. I can never really take compliments from my family for some reason. I’m always like, “Okay, thank you. Thanks, thanks, like glad you liked it, okay.” I don’t know why but it makes me really uncomfortable when they compliment me. It’s not that often to be honest but, my mom is so southern–you don’t take a compliment; you don’t brag. You just say thank you. So that’s how she is, she tells me in private but like not ever in front of another person.

Do you have trouble watching it yourself because I would think it would be hard to watch yourself in that movie?
I actually don’t have any trouble watching this movie. I don’t know what it is. I really love watching it each time. I’ve seen it three times now. Maybe because I just really don’t feel like myself. Like I have a stutter in the movie for a big portion of it, so I don’t really sound like myself and then later on I don’t look like myself so I think I really have some distance from it so maybe that’s why it’s easier to watch.

When you were a kid, I think most of the characters you played were pretty happy. Did you feel like it’s harder to convince people that you can be a darker character now?
I mean I’ve never really thought about whether I’m going to play a darker character or a lighter character. It just has been what it is. I think that I have always had to let go of caring what other people expect from me or caring what other people think that I can do because inevitably there are preconceived notions of who I am and what I’m capable of because I started out so young, which I think is unfair, of course, but I’ve let that go. I’ve let that go because I think that that would just drive me crazy and make me make choices for the wrong reasons, make choices to prove something, when in reality I don’t have anything to prove you know. I just let my work speak for itself and who I am speak for itself you know, like that’s all I can do. So I just try and let that go, but it’s been interesting because this film American Pastoral has been like a film that people have said, “Oh my god, you’re so – you’re finally so grown up!” and I’m like, “Okay, I guess.” Because Merry – actually when I play her – I start playing her at 16. I was playing someone younger than I actually was; I was 21 when I did the movie. You know, perception follows people no matter if you’re an actor or not. It’s just as human beings that we assume and put people in weird boxes without knowing them all the time. So I totally understand it and I’m guilty of it myself but I try and curb it because I know how it feels.

I’ve always felt like I was expected to be mature and wise beyond my years like an old soul, which people would say about me. It’s a compliment, but I didn’t have to try to be those things, you know. I never tried to be those things. Some days I am an old soul and some days I’m not.

Source: W Magazine

Dakota Fanning Returns to WME From CAA

She’ll soon star in ‘The Alienist’ on TNT and in an adaptation of Sylvia Plath’s ‘The Bell Jar.’
After nearly three years at CAA, Dakota Fanning is returning to WME, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned.

Fanning had first signed with WME, along with her younger sister, Elle Fanning, in 2012 after the two left their youth-focused agency, Osbrink Talent. The elder Fanning broke out as a child star with a steady string of movies, including I Am Sam and War of the Worlds.

Now just a week shy of 23, Fanning is set to play the female lead in TNT’s upcoming period thriller The Alienist, produced by Cary Fukunaga. Starring opposite Daniel Bruhl and Luke Evans, she’ll play an intrepid police secretary at the turn of the 20th century who aspires to become New York City’s first female detective.

On the big screen, Fanning can be seen next month in the Western Brimstone, which premiered at Venice last September and will be released by Momentum Pictures next month. And she will star as the troubled protagonist in Kirsten Dunst’s adaptation of Sylvia Plath’s classic novel The Bell Jar, which also will mark Fanning’s first turn as a producer.

Fanning continues to be represented by manager Brittany Kahan at Echo Lake and attorney Steve Warren at Hansen Jacobson.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

Dakota Fanning To Star In TNT Drama Series ‘The Alienist’

Dakota Fanning is set as the female lead opposite Daniel Brühl and Luke Evans in TNT’s upcoming straight-to-series drama The Alienist, a co-production of Paramount Television and Turner’s Studio T.

Based on the international best-selling novel by Caleb Carr, The Alienist is a psychological thriller set during the Gilded Age of New York City in 1896, a city of vast wealth, extreme poverty and technological innovation. When a series of haunting, gruesome murders of boy prostitutes grips the city, newly appointed police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt calls upon criminal psychologist (aka alienist) Dr. Laszlo Kreizler (Bru?hl) and newspaper reporter John Moore (Evans) to conduct a secret investigation. They are aided by a makeshift crew of singular characters, among them the intrepid Sara Howard (Fanning), a young secretary on Roosevelt’s staff who is determined to become the first female police detective in New York City. Using the emerging disciplines of psychology and early forensic investigation techniques, this band of social outsiders tracks down one of New York City’s first serial killers.

Jakob Verbruggen is set to direct. He exec produces alongside Cary Fukunaga, Eric Roth, Hossein Amini and Anonymous Content’s Steve Golin and Rosalie Swedlin. Production will begin in early 2017 in Budapest.

Fanning is known for her roles in The Twilight franchise and The Secret Life of Bees. She can currently be seen in American Pastoral, directed by and co-starring Ewan McGregor. Her upcoming credits include Please Stand By, Brimstone, Kirsten Dunst’s directorial debut The Bell Jar and Ocean’s Eight. She’s repped by CAA and Echo Lake Entertainment.

Source: Deadline Hollywood

Venice: ‘Brimstone’ Star Dakota Talks Women and Westerns

The actress was drawn to the film because of her strong female character taking charge in an otherwise male-dominated genre.

Martin Koolhoven’s 19th century American Western Brimstone premieres in competition Saturday at the Venice Film Festival. Dakota Fanning stars as a young mute woman, Liz, whose quiet family life is one day interrupted by the mysterious presence of a new minister in town, played by Guy Pearce.

It is soon obvious that he’s out to destroy her life by destroying all those she loves, and we slowly find out why as the film goes back in time in separate acts.

British actor Emilia Jones plays a young Fanning. And Game of Thrones regulars Carice van Houten, who plays her mother, and Kit Harington, who plays a mysteriously injured cowboy she decides to nurse back to health, hidden in the family’s barn, also star. Liz is continuously on the run but the reverend is never far behind.

For the director, the appeal of the film was in changing the common Western into a woman’s story. “As I was doing research, I found out that my whole idea of the old West was based on 50 percent of the population,” said Koolhoven. “Everyone feels like it was such a free time, that all things are possible, and you have this lawless land. But of course that was only true for half the population.

“Either she marries someone or she becomes a whore,” the helmer said of a woman’s options at that time. “Our whole idea of the Western myth is a completely macho idea.”

Fanning also was drawn to the pic for its strong female lead.

“That was one of the things that made me want to be a part of the film,” said the actress. “For any genre, it’s very rare to have a story about a woman in these times. It’s a lot of male-dominated films, so anytime I see a film that is really about the strength and the power of the lead female character, I’m always intrigued.”

She continued: “And the fact that it’s a Western, which you really never see a female take charge in a Western kind of film, that made it even more interesting, and definitely something that I had never done before, and something that I think will be different for audiences to watch.”

The experience also had another effect on Fanning, which is to explore the genre more as a whole. “I think now that I’ve been in a Western, it makes me want to explore watching more films like that,” she said.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter